Miscellaneous

How long does it take for the body to build antibodies from the time of infection with the coronavirus disease?

How long does it take for the body to build antibodies from the time of infection with the coronavirus disease?

People develop antibodies when their body’s immune system responds to an infection. These antibodies can be found in the blood of people previously infected whether or not they had signs or symptoms of illness. Note: It can take 1–2 weeks after the first symptoms appear for antibodies to develop in the body. Since it often takes about a week for symptoms to appear after getting infected with SARS-CoV-2, antibodies could develop about 2-3 weeks after infection. This means serology tests may not detect current SARS-CoV-2 infections and should not be used to diagnose current COVID-19.

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What happens if my HIV test is negative 3 months later?

If you get an HIV test within 3 months after a potential HIV exposure and the result is negative, get tested again in 3 more months to be sure. If you learned you were HIV-negative the last time you were tested, you can only be sure you’re still negative if you haven’t had a potential HIV exposure since your last test.

How soon after an exposure to HIV can I get tested?

To learn more about the window period and when a person should get retested, see CDC’s How soon after an exposure to HIV can an HIV test if I am infected?. If you get an HIV test within 3 months after a potential HIV exposure and the result is negative, get tested again in 3 more months to be sure.

What should I do if my HIV test result is positive?

If you had a rapid screening test, the testing site will arrange a follow-up test to make sure the screening test result was correct. If you used a self-testing kit at home, a positive HIV test result must always be confirmed by additional HIV testing performed in a health care setting.

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Do all HIV test results reveal the same thing?

No. Your HIV test result reveals only your HIV status. HIV is not necessarily transmitted every time you have sex or share needles, syringes, or other drug injection equipment. And the risk of getting HIV varies depending on the type of exposure or behavior.