Trendy

What is a 180mm lens good for?

What is a 180mm lens good for?

The Nikon 180mm f/2.8 ED lens is a legendary lens, and with good reason. It’s performance for normal daytime photography is simply outstanding. And it is pretty darn good for astrophotography also. The NGC 6357 – NGC 6334 region shot with a Nikkor 180mm F/2.8 ED AI-S lens.

What is a macro lens Canon?

The Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Lens is a specialty tool for extreme closeup imagery. It renders subjects up to 5x life-size magnification. On a full frame sensor camera you can fill the frame with a grain of rice in vivid detail.

Which lens is best for macro photography?

50mm lenses work best in capturing typical macro shots. However, these types of macro lenses have their drawbacks. 50mm lenses make subjects appear half “life-size” since they usually feature a 1:2 ratio, and require shooting at a much closer distance. But a 50mm lens is a must if you want a general walk-around lens.

READ:   Can you put out a white phosphorus fire?

What is the best focal length for macro photography?

All things considered, macro lenses with a focal length of between 90mm and 105mm are most popular. They’re a manageable size and weight, affordable to buy, and have a convenient minimum focus distance of around 30cm.

What lens is good for close ups?

Since making close-up shots falls in general photography, you do not need any special lens to do it. If your camera has an 85mm to 135mm range, it will be ideal for your close-ups. Most photographers believe that 85mm is the most ideal.

What is the best aperture for macro photography and why?

When doing macro images or close-ups, the ideal depth of field is almost always shallow, therefore the typical aperture number for macro photography is between f/5.6 and f/11. Those small aperture values are necessary to make sure that all the details of your subject will be sharp and in focus.

What is the best aperture for macro photography?

between f/5.6 and f/11
When doing macro images or close-ups, the ideal depth of field is almost always shallow, therefore the typical aperture number for macro photography is between f/5.6 and f/11. Those small aperture values are necessary to make sure that all the details of your subject will be sharp and in focus.

READ:   Does it matter what mouthwash you use?

What MM is best for macro photography?

50mm
50mm lenses work best in capturing typical macro shots. However, these types of macro lenses have their drawbacks. 50mm lenses make subjects appear half “life-size” since they usually feature a 1:2 ratio, and require shooting at a much closer distance. But a 50mm lens is a must if you want a general walk-around lens.

How good is the canon 180 macro lens?

The canon_180macro is very good, but about twice the price of the Tamron 180/3.5 macro. There was a Sigma AF 180mm f/3.5 EX HSM APO macro, but it’s been discontinued. The new sigma_180_macro is priced about the same as the Canon 180/3.5L at about $1500.

Is the tamron_180macro_canon worth it?

The tamron_180macro_canon is a good lens, with high central resolution, even wide open at f3.5 and closest focus (1:1). Resolution holds up quite well even out to the edges of the frame, especially when close focused. At longer focus distances the corners wide open are a little soft but sharpen up well by f5.6.

READ:   Can transfer be challenged in court?

Is Tamron lens good for macro photography?

So Tamrons lens can, in theory, be used from a range of about 36cm, which is a very comfortable working distance. The reality is not quite so generous but the working distance remains very comfortable so this is clearly going to be an interesting lens for anybody who is serious about macro photography.

Does the Tamron 180 have image stabilization?

The Tamron 180/3.5 does not have any image stabilization and the focusing motor is a regular geared motor, so it’s not as fast as an Ultrasonic motor and it makes more noise. For macro work while IS can be useful, it’s generally less effective than at longer focus distances and a tripod is almost always better.